Hannah Hirsekorn

My work is an unveiling of rigid and malleable aspects of human identity through material and process. It is the series of incongruities that arise between one’s innate need to make a difference as an individual and the desperate desire to advance the group as a whole. I explore tangible anxieties that manifest themselves through a struggle with feelings of inadequacy. Aesthetically, I am interested in contextual intersections between fibers and metals and the spaces where these materials are manipulated can show how the material itself can change the identity of the individual member of society. Simone de Beauvoir attributed the rise of the iron industry to the displacement of women as the second sex, thus relegated to menial textile factory work. A sense of uneasiness in my work reflects the perverse stigma of these gendered material histories. Through tongue-in-cheek imagery, my work recontextualizes the blurred lines between the organic and produced. I am interested in exploring the conflict of identity and strain between an individual’s obligations to societal categories of their perceived role and the struggle to retain originality and an authentic license to create.

Just as the individual worker concerns their-self with their contribution to the group, I reflect on the nature of my own participation as a working part of a larger sum. Whether embedded in a production foundry in Chicago, or in the midst of a batik dying assembly line in Lusaka, Zambia, my curiosity and work ethic have led me to be exposed to a variety of disciplines, cultures and materials. I consider objects not just by their physical properties, but in the context of their production histories and my own personal, experiential associations. My practice strives to strengthen and motivate communities through a collaborative practice. The interactive artwork provides a foundation for education as well as developing a language of cooperation to potentially flow into larger, more abstract socioeconomic collaboration. Using the workshop as a frame, the art explores the compatibilities and tensions between materials and their manipulation processes. The transformation of matter’s form in this experiential-based sculpture highlights the juxtaposition of harmony and discord through translation of intent. I strive to illuminate the production histories of fibers and metals, especially those centered around teamwork and specialization, in a performative light of communal contribution. I utilize the material resources around me to help break down feelings of inadequacy and historical constraints. Through a collaboration of capable hands and the symbiotic sharing of ideas and objectives, a community can make a contribution that not only fulfills each of the contributors individually, but also nurtures the advancement of the group

Hannah Hirsekorn

email: hannahhirsekorn@gmail.com

phone: 7074905893